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ROBUSTA COFFEE

ROBUSTA COFFEE – INTRODUCTION

Robusta coffee comes from the Coffea canephora plant. As the name suggests, it’s a sturdier, more robust variety of coffee (compared to Arabica), and accounts for about 40% of the world’s total coffee production

Robusta coffee can grow in low altitudes, as well as diverse climatic conditions. Farmers love to grow it because grows faster, and is more disease- and pest-resistant than Arabica coffee.

 

GROWTH FACTORS

ROBUSTA COFFEE

SOILS

DEEP, FERTILE, RICH IN ORGANIC MATTER, WELL DRAINED AND SLIGHTLY ACIDIC (pH 6.0-6.5)

SLOPES

GENTLE SLOPES TO FAIRLY LEVEL FIELDS

ELEVATION

500-1000m

ASPECT

NORTH, EAST AND NORTH- EAST ASPECTS

TEMPERATURE

2000 C – 3000 C; HOT, HUMID

RELATIVE HUMIDITY

80-90%

ANNUAL RAINFALL

1000-2000 mm

BLOSSOM SHOWERS

FEBRUARY – MARCH (25-40 mm)

BACKING SHOWERS

MARCH-APRIL (50-75 mm) WELL DISTRIBUTED

 

What is Robusta Coffee?
Robusta coffee is a strong, full-bodied coffee with a unique, earthy flavour. It has other distinct attributes – such as higher bitterness and lower acidity. Its flavours are bolder and darker, and exhibit a chocolaty note in the brew that’s greatly valued, especially in espressos.

Although there are several Coffea plant species, Robusta is one of the most commonly grown coffees in the world. Robusta coffee matures more rapidly, results in higher yields, is easier to grow commercially, and contains more caffeine and antioxidants than Arabica coffee.

 

PRODUCING REGIONS


Parana, Sao Paulo, Minas Gerais, Rio de Janeiro, Espirito Santo, Bahia, Pernambuco, Rondonia, Mato Grosso, Goias, and Ceará.

Brazil is the world’s leading coffee grower and exporter. Introduced in the late 18thcentury, by 1920 over 80% of the worlds coffee was from Brazil. Today, Brazil accounts for 30% of global coffee production.

Almost 300,000 farmers in 1,900 municipalities produce coffee in Brazil; the four main coffee states are Minas Gerais, Espirito Santo, Sao Paulo, and Bahia, which together produce 90% of Brazilian coffee. There is a Brazilian shorthand for the type of coffee grown in each region; Group I coffee is the highest quality Arabica with no Rio cups, Group II is Rio-cupping Arabica which has an iodine taste (prized in Eastern Mediterranean countries) Group III is Conillon, or Brazilian grown Robusta.

MINAS GERAIS:

This Arabica producing state supplies around half of all Brazilian coffee and almost 70% of all Brazilian Arabica in three defined áreas:

The Sul de Minas is a traditional coffee powerhouse, where generations of small coffee farmers have cultivated the rolling hills at an altitude of 700m to 1200m. Due to rising labour costs, mechanical harvesting is now very common here, along with the rest of the Brazilian coffee area where the topography allows it. Like the rest of Minas Gerais state, the main varieties of Arabica grown here are Mundo Novo and Catuai, although several other Arabica varieties are also grown. The Sul de Minas is a major producer of Group I sun-dried coffees.

The Zona da Mata, in the east of Minas Gerais has steep topography between 550m and 1200m, which means all harvesting is done manually. Almost 50% of the coffee area here comes from small farms below 10 hectares, compared to a 30% level in the Sul de Minas. Traditionally, because of a moist harvest climate, the Zona da Mata has been the biggest supplier of Group II coffee. This region is now also focussing on high quality washed and sun dried coffees from specific microclimates for the speciality sector.

The Cerrado, flat highlands in the west of Minas Gerais, sits at an altitude of 850m to 1250m. It’s the newest area in Minas Gerais, compared to the rest of Brazil. A region of large, mechanised farms with less than 10% of coffee cultivation from farms below 10 hectares. The Cerrado has become a touchstone in terms of production and cultivation techniques. The region is recognised as an extremely reliable, high quality supplier of various fine coffees.

ESPIRITO SANTO:

Brazil’s second biggest coffee state produces almost 80% of the country’s Conillon (Robusta), mostly in the centre-north. In the south, Arabica is grown, and Espirito Santo farmers have developed some very interesting washed Arabica’s on altitudes of up to 1200m.

 

COFFEE BENEFITS

Cut the pain, increase your fibe intake, protection against cirrhosis of the liver, lowered risk of type 2 Diabestes, lowered risk of Alzheimer’s disease, reduces suicide risk and depression, protection against parkison’s, coffee drinkers have stronger DNA, lower risk of multiple sclerosis, coffee reduces colerectal cancer risk.

BRAZILIAN COFFEE BEANS

Product Description:

NCM/HS CODE

09.01.11

VARIETY

BOURBON, TYPICA, MUNDO NOVA, CATUAI,

MARAGOGYPE, CATIMOR, SUMATRA

TYPE OF COFFEE

ARABICA AND CONILLON (ROBUSTA)

ARABICA

WASHED / UNWASHED

1) STRICTLY SOFT  3) SOFT  4) SOFTSH  5) hARD 

6) RIOY  7) free from rio

8) rio flavour  9) rank rio

CONILLON (ROBUSTA)

1)EXCELENTE  2) BOA  3)REGULAR  4) ANORMAL

SCREEN

19 / 18 / 17 / 16 / 15 / 14 / 13 / 12 / 11 / 10 / 09 / 08

FLAT BACKGROUND

MATURITY

READY FOR CONSUMPTION

COUNTRY OF ORIGIN

BRAZIL

region OF ORIGIN

ESPIRITO SANTO AND MINAS GERAIS

PORT OF DEPARTURE

RIO DE JANEIRO- RJ  /  VITORIA-ES

HARVEST

ARABICA

CONILLON (ROBUSTA)

 

APRIL TO SEPTEMBER

APRIL TO SEPTEMBER

SUPPLY PERIOD

FULL YEAR

TYPE OF CONTAINER

20’GP  /  40’HC

CONTAINER LOADED WEIGHT

20’GP  19 TONS

40’HC  25 TONS

FULL CONTAINER LOADED

440 BAGS BY BOAT NOT PALLETIZED

CONTAINER 20’ LOADED

320 BAGS BY BOAT NOT PALLETIZED

PACKAGE WEIGHT 

60KG – 132,27 LBS

hUMIDITY

SPECIAL COFFEE 11,5 TO 12,00%

conillon 12,5% (abroad market)

arabica 11,00% to 12,00% (abroad market)

 

SHELF LIFE

ARABICA

CONILLON (ROBUSTA)

 

8 MONTHS

+12 MONTHS

PRODUCT ACCEPTANCE

MAXIMUM 1,00% OF STRANGE MATTERS AND

IMPURITIES

COFFEE PRODUCING AREA

2,339,630 ha

producing regions

parana, sao paulo, minas gerais, cearA,

rio de janeiro, espirito santo, goiAs,

pernambuco, bahia, mato grosso e

rondonia